Treatments for Motion Sickness

Treatments for Motion Sickness

We will be experiencing just about every mode of transportation during this trip. We will be flying, driving in minivans (a lot, through city traffic as well as curvy, mountainous roads), riding in speedboats, riding in the backs of pickups over rough mountain roads, riding in tuk-tuks, riding bikes, riding tractors, etc.

Unfortunately, traveling causes misery for many people in the form of motion sickness. Motion sickness results from when the motion that your inner ear senses differs from the motion that you visualize. Many people experience motion sickness to one degree or another, some more severe than others. Some only get sick on ships during the roughest seas, while others can experience it during short drivers or even while skiing on an overcast day. Motion sickness progresses from a feeling of uneasiness to sweating and dizziness, and progresses to nausea and vomiting. Symptoms are exacerbated by lack of ventilation, inability to see outside the vehicle (and visualize the movement), being inside an enclosed space, or having anxiety or fear of traveling.

Estimates of the prevalence of motion sickness varies, from 3% to 60%, depending on the study. Many researchers believe almost everyone suffers from motion sickness, given strong enough motion stimuli. Women and children are generally more at risk for motion sickness. Continue reading “Treatments for Motion Sickness”

Staying Healthy in Thailand – MORE Things to Think About

Staying Healthy in Thailand – MORE Things to Think About

Staying healthy while on the trip is a very high priority for students, faculty, family, friends …… really everyone. Being ill on a trip like this really is not very fun. So far, we have had few illnesses on this trip. And there are several things we can do to stay as healthy as we can, although sometimes, stuff happens.

Before you leave…..

There are a few things you can do before even getting on the plane to help keep you healthy. The most important thing you can do is make sure you have all your vaccinations, especially your COVID-19 vaccine. This was covered in another post in detail. Make sure you have the standard vaccinations (DTP, MMR, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, etc.), as well as typhoid. As recent measles outbreaks have shown, even standard vaccinations like MMR are important when traveling abroad.

Continue reading “Staying Healthy in Thailand – MORE Things to Think About”
Staying Healthy in Thailand – Vaccinations

Staying Healthy in Thailand – Vaccinations

UPDATE: Make sure you are fully vaccinated with an approved COVID-19 vaccine (2 doses of Pfizer or Moderna, or 1 does of the J&J) and have proof of vaccination with you. You can have the CDC card that was given to you when you were vaccinated, or have an electronic version such as Docket (on the iOS App Store or the Android App Store). As of right now, the Docket App only works for those in Minnesota, New Jersey, and Utah, so if you received your vaccine in another state, you may have to find another way to show digital proof of vaccination.

We are also STRONGLY recommending that everyone who is eligible for a booster get a booster before traveling at all. Overwhelming evidence shows that having the full COVID-19 vaccine series plus a booster is highly protective against the Omicron variant of COVID-19.

Note that Thailand is requiring proof of vaccination to enter the country. There is an alternate quarantine for those not vaccinated, but we cannot accommodate anyone on alternate quarantine on this trip. Therefore, if you are not fully vaccinated, you will not be allowed on the trip.

If you have had COVID-19, please obtain medical proof that you had COVID-19 from a medical facility. And make sure you have had the vaccine even if you’ve tested positive; Thailand requires full vaccination regardless of whether you’ve had COVID-19 or not.

As for other vaccines, one of the nice things about traveling to Thailand is that you don’t need too many special vaccinations other than the ones that you SHOULD have already (MMR, Td, Hep A, Hep B, Varicella if you haven’t had chicken pox, and possibly meningococcus, especially if you live in  dorms).  Pay particular attention to make sure your tetanus-diptheria is up to date, as well as the Hep A and B series.  If you need the Hep A and Hep B, get started NOW as Hep B is a 4-6 month regimen.  Here is the CDC’s recommendations:

Beyond the standard vaccinations, the only ones that the CDC recommends are typhoid and malaria, if you are going to areas that have high prevalences.  Typhoid is a good idea; on one of my first trips to Thailand while at the U of Utah, one of the faculty contracted typhoid just before leaving Thailand, and it made for an unpleasant flight home, to say the least.

Continue reading “Staying Healthy in Thailand – Vaccinations”
Squat Toilets and Bucket Showers – Essential Information

Squat Toilets and Bucket Showers – Essential Information

Traveling to remote parts of the world, especially in Asia, may require Americans to rethink some fundamental aspects of their daily activities. We have found over the years that the squat toilet and the bucket shower can be problematic for some students. To help everyone prepare, we want to provide some information to consider.

Continue reading “Squat Toilets and Bucket Showers – Essential Information”