Water Issues in Thailand

Water Issues in Thailand

By: Caitlin Lemmon and Mariah Hartle

Water is a very important resource for the people in Thailand. With a population of over 68 million people, things such as urbanization and industrial expansion are impacting water quality for the Thais. Untreated waste, from growing industries have been steadily increasing in the water. Because of this their main source of income, agriculture is being strongly affected. Many farmers have not been properly taught how to conserve their water use when they plant their crops, therefore much of the water available is being wasted. If a proper solution was implanted for these farmers, and waste was cleaned from the drinking water, this crisis could be solved quickly.(Suwal, 1) Continue reading “Water Issues in Thailand”

HIV/AIDS in Thailand

HIV/AIDS in Thailand

By: Chloe Withers and Lacy Carter

AIDS or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome is one of the worst pandemics the world has ever known. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus or HIV. AIDS broke out in the early 1980’s and in just over 30 years it has become one of the leading causes of death worldwide. AIDS has resulted in the deaths of over 28 million people that we know of, resulting in a significant global impact (Bosner, 2001). As awareness rises and research progressed the outcome of people living with HIV/AIDS continues to improve around the world. Continue reading “HIV/AIDS in Thailand”

The Karen

By: Amanda Phillips & Kristin Harko

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http://abeautyglorious.blogspot.com/2008/11/beauty-around-world.html

Due to war, persecution, or violence many people are forced to flee their own country.  Everyday these people fear persecution based on race, religion, nationality, group membership, or political standing.  More often than not, these people cannot return to their home countries and seek refuge in a second or third country permanently.  These people seeking refuge are known as refugees.  An expanding group of refugees found in Salt Lake City, Utah is the Karen refugees from Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand.

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Traditional Thai Medicine

By: Erin Ward & Heather Stuart

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Worms will not eat living wood where the vital sap is flowing;

rust will not hinder the opening of a gate when the hinges are used each day.

Movement gives health and life.

Stagnation brings disease and death.”
– proverb in traditional Chinese Medicine

(“Thai yoga history,” 2013)

The origins of traditional Thai medicine remain as mysterious as the Thai people themselves. One popular theory suggests that the Thai people migrated from China around the 8th century C.E. With neighbors such as Burma, Vietnam, and Laos, their indigenous culture is sure to have been influenced by the outside cultures of their new surroundings.  Consequently, traditional Thai medicine is extremely diverse, and is grounded in two traditions: the Folk tradition and the Royal tradition.

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Macro-Economics and Thailand’s Poor

By: Kendall Brannen, Westminster College, B.S. Economics, May 1, 2013

My interests while studying Economics at Westminster has been economic wellbeing of communities and what it takes for those communities to be sustainable and self-serving. When I was initially thinking about this assignment I wanted to look at the macroeconomic situation that is specific to Thailand. In this paper I will look at the descriptive statistics that surround the macro-economy and attempt to extrapolate more of the story that lay within each statistic/variable. As you can imagine there are a lot of factors that surround each observation, which for this observation paper I will simplify assumptions and take a high level approach.

I began researching to understand the economic conditions within Thailand and how it compares to the world economy with general descriptive statistics of the major economic indicators used globally. Thailand’s Gini Coefficient, a measure of income equality distribution, ranked 14th highest among 140 countries. That number rose between 2002 and 2009 from 42 to 53.6.  From this observation Thailand is becoming increasingly more unequal in its income distributions.  There is direct correlation between income distributions and poverty, when the lower quintiles have a larger percentage of the population within it, the income disparity widens and because of this the gini coefficient is a great indicator of a country’s poverty level. Below is a simple graph to help explain the concept of equal income distribution. It assumes a one to one slope for income to population as a fair measure.

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Phanom-Rung

By: Lara Gallacher & Erica Houck

Why is it an important place to visit?

Khmer refers to an ancient kingdom in Southeastern Asia which, was in it’s highest power during the 11th century. Phanom-Rung is one of the most beautiful and important of the Khmer historic areas in the country of Thailand. It may have been a prototype for another significant site called Angkor Wat. The location enough provides a reason to visit as Phanom-Rung was built on top of a 1256 foot tall inactive volcano. Similarly, it has a historical importance as the resting area for pilgrims traveling from Angkor to Phimai. This Hindu temple complex represents the largest and most comprehensively restored historical park. The structures in Phanom-Rung have been well preserved by avoiding use as a battlefield and by limited overgrowth of that area. Other Khmer monuments have been largely reclaimed by the jungle but this park is neatly groomed and protected from environmental reclamation.

Significance of various parts of the park:

Main SanctuaryThere are several areas of the park that are especially important as religious, historical and architectural artifacts. The general layout of the park represents Hindu beliefs. The buildings line up all the way to the main pagoda, which represents the layout of Hindu heaven centered on Shiva. Also important historically and architecturally, are the religious carvings found on the outer surfaces of every building. These most frequently depict stories of the gods. It also has Buddhist elements from the era when it was adapted. Buddhist influences are visible in the later 17th century additions to the park including the pagoda, the stairway and the Naga bridge.

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